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Hosting a site and a clueless souls

My last night(I wrote this post on 25th) was spent researching,buying and configuring my newly bought shared web space. As it happens I used to have my site along with other college fest sites I designed (or actually tried to design you might say) on a shared hosting server bought from webguru. But over the years I became very frustrated with their service. I still remember the last time at the time of our techfest,countless times I had to call them to explain that their server wasn’t updating the last modification date and it was causing a real pain as the users were getting a cached copy of the site.

And later i discovered that the site was frequently down for their server problems. So I decided it was time to move on. So after a lot of google search I zeroed on hostmonster. Alas I didn’t have any coupon codes so it costed me almost 71, but after the registration it was a pleasant experiences. Their cpanel was impressive, and they were supporting unlimited domain hosting too.

That was good for me. So far so good. I thought about testing their server speed a little so I uploaded my little leecher there and started a server to server leech to see the speed.And bingo!! The transfer speed was a whooping 8000kbps. though after a little time it went to an average 3000kbps but that too was more than what I’ll ever need :)

Going to configure the server tonight :D

Hope this has more ram than my previous one :(

It had only 64mb I need atleast 128mb.

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