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AaKash : India's own low priced Tablet

Finally India produces it's own version of homegrown tablet. And here it is




The wait for the world's cheapest tablet is finally over! The $35 tablet nicknamed Aakash was launched today and will be available at retail stores at a maximum retail price of Rs 2999 ($60), said its maker Datawind. The Aakash tablet, previously nicknamed as Sakshat, looks different from the prototype flaunted by the telecom minister Kapil Sibal last year. However, the specs of the device are same as previously reported.


However it seems that currently there are two versions available at the present.


Version 1 Specs: 

  • Android 2.2
  • Screen Size is  7″ Resistive
  • Processor: 366 MHz + another processor for Graphics or HD Video
  • RAM : 256 MB
  • Flash memory: 2GB + 2GB Micro-SD (expandable up to 32 GB)
  • USB ports: 2
  • Battery Power is 2100mAH
And the Version 2 adds the following in it

  • The $60 tablet for retail sales has an inbuilt cellular modem and SIM to access internet, which will be absent in the $35 device, supplied to the government.
Both versions of the tablet, will run on Google's Android platform, with WiFi connectivity for internet access and cloud storage. The tablets will have 256 MB of RAM, a 32 GB expandable memory slot and two USB ports. 

The commercial version of the tablet would have no duty waivers or subsidy, as in the government's version. An inbuilt cellular modem and SIM card will add to the price of the commercial tablet. 

The commercial version of the tablet, is expected be out within 60 days, of its launch on October 5. 

Datawind adds that it is supplying to the government at a price of Rs 2200, which includes sales tax and replacement warranty. "The $35 price is achievable at higher volume levels. When we supply the product to the government at $35, then too it will allow us a margin, albeit at higher volumes," Datawind CEO added. 

We will however have to wait to see how it fairs against the present tablets.



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