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Maximum Call Stack size exceeded: My mishap with nodejs and MongoDB

Working with nodejs is always an adventure and mix MongoDB with it, and it becomes very interesting for a nodejs enthusiast like me.

While working on a pet project involving Native MongoDb driver and nodejs I encountered a weird problem.

RangeError: Maximum call stack size exceeded
 
As usual my first thought was to Google out what I was facing and googling it out led me to the following to links.
 
Also In some posts in MongoDB’s forum I saw that peoples said saving in `process.nextTick` or wrapping the call function in `parseInt` will also fix the problem, but it most certainly didn't work for me.So I started digging in on my own and soon enough found the reason.

If you’re trying to save a document and saving process somehow exited with an RangeError: Maximum call stack size exceeded exception, it’s related to what you want to save in the database. I had this problem also, and when I checked my object, I found that the problem is related to the big DOM Object that I included in the object, and when I removed that, the object saved in MongoDB correctly.

My piece of buggy code:

collection.insert({
  seq: nextSeq,
  profileIdentity: profileIdentity,
  sectionData: secData, //the buggy part 
  findDateTime: new Date()
});
 The problem occurred in `secData` array. In the second item of that array I had a big DOM Object and after removing that object from array (and of course, doing that job in a different way), problem solved.

Comments

  1. Same wording:
    http://afshinm.name/nodejs-mongodb-and-rangeerror-maximum-call-stack-size-exceeded/

    U the same guy?

    ReplyDelete

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